Welcome to the FLOW “wing” of the Mobility Academy!

It is the aim of the FLOW project to put walking and cycling on an equal footing with motorised modes by developing a user-friendly methodology to assess the effectiveness of walking and cycling measures in addressing urban road congestion in conjunction with transport modelling tools. Three FLOW e-courses will be offered in 2017 addressing different aspects of the subject.

  1. Congestion and your city: the FLOW approach (30.01-24.02.2017)
  2. FLOW and transport modelling: looking at the tools (22.05-23.06.2017)
  3. Putting it all together: the policy context of applying the FLOW tools (13.11-08.12.2017)

 You’re welcome to take part in any or all of them.

 For more information on the FLOW project, see the project website.

For instructions on how to register for a course, click here.

This e-course introduces participants to the FLOW project’s philosophy on congestion and congestion reduction through walking and cycling measures. They look at the FLOW conceptual framework and the role of walking a cycling in congestion reduction, the FLOW Handbook on Indicators that measure congestion reduction in the context of walking cycling and the FLOW portfolio of walking and cycling measures relevant for congestion reduction. A concrete example of the application of FLOW tools in the context of College Green in Dublin is demonstrated.

This e-course looks at the FLOW impact assessment tool, which helps cities determine what congestion-related or socio-economic impacts walking or cycling measures may have. It also looks at what kind of data is necessary and how it could be collected and validated and what indicators are useful to look at.

These e-courses provide you with the background and ideas of the FLOW project and how you can get the most out of this online platform and this course. It looks at the current context in which we are working and the extent to which walking and cycling are generally incorporated in transport planning. It then addresses the paradigm shift that FLOW (and others) see as necessary in order for non-motorised transport to fulfil its potential in addressing issues of urban congestion.