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Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

by Bonnie Fenton -
Number of replies: 6

Please post your responses to Unit 6 questions in the discussion area.

In reply to Bonnie Fenton

Re: Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

by Deleted user -
  1. What initiatives does your country‘s government have to encourage the use of EVs and the build-up of charging infrastructure? Are there certain goals, special regulations, specifications, guidelines?

There is an extensive range of information and guidance to support good practice in the use of electric vehicles and infrastructure in the UK.  A significant amount of work is done by a government department (the Office for Low Emission Vehicles) to promote EV’s.  The UK automotive industry is also very active in promoting electric vehicles and infrastructure with support provided through the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders.

As discussed in Unit 3, the government has recently announced a range of measures with an overall budget of £500m for 2015 to 2020.  This is included in a new national strategy has just been published in the titled ‘Investing in Ultra-Low Emission Vehicles in the UK 2015 to 2020’.  This is a strategy document which also sets out potential investment packages to support low carbon vehicles and infrastructure

The UK government’s has decided to continue to support a Plug-In Car Grant scheme and a Plug-In Van Grant for commercial vehicles.  The recent announcement in April 2014 has been supported by a ‘Go Ultra Low Campaign’ which the government has adopted as a method of good practice to promote EV's in the UK.

 

The website aims to provide helpful information for potential purchasers of EV’s and explains in reasonably simple terms about the various EV models available in the market, how and where the vehicles can be powered, and also affordability.          I have included a logo for the campaign and web-link to share with everyone participating on this learning module.

 

https://www.goultralow.com/

  1. Is it legally possible in your country to finance the build-up of charging infrastructure by grid fees

Power networks in the UK are operated as private enterprises, with those who manage the distribution network (in the north east of England it is Northern Powergrid) and energy suppliers who manage the supply of electricity and gas.

 

I am not aware of any legal framework which could be used to require a power network or energy supplier to install or manage EV charging systems.  The network operators approach to sustainability is focused largely on energy efficiency (smart metering etc) and developing a Smart-grid to provide a stable network to meet user demand.

 

There are a few energy suppliers who have partner arrangements with Charging Point manufacturers, and can arrange the installation of equipment for customers which includes home installations.  The companies that I am aware of are British Gas, Npower and EDF.

 

Paul from Sunderland

Attachment Go Ultra Low logo.jpg
In reply to Bonnie Fenton

Re: Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

by Deleted user -
  1. What initiatives does your country‘s government have to encourage the use of EVs and the build-up of charging infrastructure? Are there certain goals, special regulations, specifications, guidelines?

Plugged-in Places Grant Funding According to official public statistics, by the end of June 2013, over 5,500 charge points had been provided through the eight Plugged-in Places projects. Most of the original Plugged-in Places projects completed in March 2013. However, some including Plugged-in Midlands and ChargePlace Scotland still have funding available to help install charging equipment.

National Scheme Grant Funding through the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (a cross government organisation). The UK government also implemented a national scheme in 2013 to support the installation of charging equipment on the public estate. More information related to eligibility, grant levels and guidance can be accessed here.

Local Sustainable Transport Fund: The Government set aside £600 million for Local Authority sustainable transport measures in 2012 to run until 2015. Each of the Councils who applied had to identify geographical areas in which to improve transport sustainability by a variety of means. A lot of the winning bids did not contain any reference to Electric Vehicles and so use of the fund for EV charging points in these regions is not possible. However, for those Councils that did mention EVs in their bids, it is possible to fund EV charging points using LSTF money (as has been done in South Yorkshire including Rotherham). LSTF funding can be used alongside Plugged-in Places funding to provide free or nearly free charging points to a business or public organisation.

The latest round of Government funding for charging infrastructure allows householders to apply for funding to install a public on-street charge point at a suitable location close to where they live. Interested householders should approach their local authority who can apply for funding on the householder’s behalf and oversee the installation of the point.

  1. Is it legally possible in your country to finance the build-up of charging infrastructure by grid fees?

It is probably possible to raise finance by this means, and the UK government has in the past used levies for provision of green infrastructure. At the present time the government is actively reducing this means of raising finance in order to reduce the costs of electricity to consumers.

See also response from Paul in Sunderland.

In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

by Deleted user -

Hello Stephen,

Hope you are well.  I am aware of energy suppliers with an interest in the provision of charging equipment to homes, possibly because they will see the end benefit through increased electricity consumption.  I am not aware of any energy suppliers who have yet to fund or install charging points that would be available to the public in general.  Is this something you are investigating in Rotherham?

Regards,

Paul

In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

by Deleted user -

Hi Paul

We are not aware of any energy suppliers who are installing or funding at the moment, however we have a close relationship with npower as a result of our LSTF project and hopefully they might be interested in commercial opportunities as the market develops. I agree that the domestic charger market looks increasingly likely to attract their attention and from my point of view that is probably a good thing as we are [at present] far too dependant on government grant funding to put anything in place using our own funds. I would recommend having a word with your planning team to see what you can get put in place through conditions on new developments.

Regards 

Steve

In reply to Bonnie Fenton

Re: Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

by Deleted user -

Our country has put a lot of effort (and money) in stimulating EV. I do not know when it started and who started it. We have a national 'formule E-team' (with a royal prince) to promote EV. I have attended to several of their huge events. Another important point is the start of the project 'Amsterdam electric', where the city focusses on EV (In the inner city you got a free parking place when you had bought an electric car!) and uses EV itself.

The government aims at 200.000 electric vehicles in 2020 and gives several incentives to get there: you do not have to pay an important tax if you buy a car with low emissions (it can come up to about 35 % of the new price of the car). Next to that you do not have to pay roadtaxes for a certain period (up to 2017) and when you drive a leased car normally a percentage up to 25 % of the new price is seen as an income on which you have to pay taxes. This is not the case when you lease an electric vehicle.

For those who want to have a detailed plan of our government to stimulate EV, please visit the website:

http://www.rvo.nl/sites/default/files/bijlagen/Action%20Plan%20English.pdf

In reply to Bonnie Fenton

Re: Unit 6: Political instruments and financial incentives

by Jelena Nikolić -

The EV and EV charging infrastructure is a new topic for us. I don't have a positive example from my city or country (except city of Pančevo, as I mentioned before).

We have to do a lot on national and local level for impoving the conditions for use EV. At first to adopt regulations, strategies and plans in accordance with the low on energy efficiency.

Thanks Paul, Bert and Stephen, who presented examples from their countries.

 

Regards, 

Jelena Nikolić