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Unit 5: Taking into account partners and stakeholders

Unit 5: Taking into account partners and stakeholders

by Bonnie Fenton -
Number of replies: 5

Please post your responses to Unit 5 questions in the discussion area.

In reply to Bonnie Fenton

Re: Unit 5: Taking into account partners and stakeholders

by Deleted user -
  • What are the authorities concerned and how do they need to be involved?

There are a number of key organisations that need to be involved in the process which ideally should be at an early stage.

The local municipal authority has a number of roles to play which include identifying strategic locations particularly if developing a network of charging point locations.  The Planning department will need to be consulted to determine if planning consent is required, which can depend on the size and location of the post.  The Highways department may need to give permission if installing the post in highway and for any electrical connection works in the highway.

Consultation with politicians, local citizens who may be directly affected, and also possibly the emergency services including Fire, Police and Ambulance Services need to be considered.

The energy distribution and supply market in the UK is managed by private companies.  The distribution company (owner of the cables in the ground) needs to be contacted to ensure there is sufficient capacity to ensure a connection can be made.  The energy supplier need to be contacted to arrange for the electrical supply needed to power the posts.

  • Which organizations or companies could build-up and operate charging stations?

There is an increasing number of companies in the UK who arrange the installation and management of charging posts.  Most management companies operating Charging Points tend to be linked to Post manufacturers and suppliers or electrical contractors.  The range of Charging Station products is constantly expanding and developing, and those with a wider range of Posts have been part of regional installation programmes funded by the government.

 

  • Which (local) providers can furnish the resources? Which providers will profit, and which    could be damaged?

It helps if the contractor appointed to install and maintain the Charging Posts is locally based.  This is especially useful if a fault occurs, as it could shorten the length of time taken for investigation of the fault, and the time that the post may be away for repair.  This in turn benefits the end-user (EV driver) by reducing delays. 

It is also beneficial to appoint locally based companies as this helps support the local economy.  If an alternative, not locally based company is appointed, this may have a damaging impact on the local company’s ability to sustain jobs.

  • Are there any others who could be affected?

If a Charging Point is installed in a location previously used by another person or persons they could be adversely affected by a proposal.  Generally, this may relate to the use of a parking space, and alternative arrangements should be planned for those affected.

  • Who shall use it? Who is the user and what are his / her interests, needs and predispositions?

The majority of EV owners and drivers in the UK currently tend to be part of businesses or public organisations and use electric cars as part of their jobs.  This situation tends to rely heavily on workplace charging stations.  

Private EV owners are starting to rise in numbers now that the range of electric car models is increasing (and hopefully the cost decreasing).  Most may rely on home charging but a public network is beneficial in that it allows mid-journey charging.  This comes back to the Unit 3 discussion on the ‘chicken and egg’ solution.  In Sunderland’s case we have taken the decision to build a public accessible network to give confidence and hopefully encourage the take up of EV’s.

Paul from Sunderland

In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 5: Taking into account partners and stakeholders

by Deleted user -

Hi Paul,

thank you very much for the detailed report of the partner and stakeholders in Sunderland. I appreciate the fact that Sunderland has taken the decision to build a public charging network. Does Sunderland already have plans which charging technology and therefore how many charing posts will be build up?

Michael

In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 5: Taking into account partners and stakeholders

by Deleted user -

Hello Michael,

In Sunderland, we have installed a relatively small number of charging points (50 in total).  The overall amount installed to date ensures that 99% of all residential, industrial and retail developments within the city boundary will be within a 1.5 mile (approx 2.5km) radius of a charging point with 90% being within 1.0 mile (approx 1.5km). The charging points are located to provide drivers with greater confidence that a wider network is available for electric cars to recharge in Sunderland.

Apart from a few specific workplace locations, we are unlikely to install anymore in the near future.  This is mainly to see how popular the selected post locations are and also to see how home and workplace charging impacts on the use of public charging points.

Paul from Sunderland

In reply to Bonnie Fenton

Re: Unit 5: Taking into account partners and stakeholders

by Deleted user -
  • What are the authorities concerned and how do they need to be involved?

The Local authority in Rotherham responsible for planning, highways and car parking is the council. Any provision of charge points or supply works on the highway would have to be approved through normal processes. However at the present time we are not considering provision of on-street charging due to potential enforcement problems. The council is also the responsible authority for making safe any infrastructure damaged by collisions.

  • Which organizations or companies could build-up and operate charging stations?

As far as I can determine charge point provision in the UK is dominated by a few national (and international) energy suppliers, however there would be no legal reason why a start-up enterprise could not buy energy from the grid for supply to local charging infrastructure. Due to the bulk purchase discounts available from the generators through the grid, it is unlikely that a small scale enterprise would be able to supply energy at a competitive price.

  • Which (local) providers can furnish the resources? Which providers will profit, and which could be damaged?

There are no local producers of charge points, though some local companies are involved in domestic installations. Most profit (and risk in the early stages) will fall to the larger energy suppliers. There could be substantial damage to the competitive marketplace if one provider achieves market dominance or a virtual monopoly

  • Are there any others who could be affected?

Ultimately the consumer may benefit in the early stages as suppliers incentivise take-up with low prices, however in the longer term a monopoly situation may be counter-productive. This would have negative effects for vehicle manufacturers, local dealerships and the consumer

  • Who shall use it? Who is the user and what are his / her interests, needs and predispositions?

At first the use of infrastructure will be largely confined to “early adopters” many of whom will view public charge points as a “safety net” as they get used to an unfamiliar technology. As time progresses users will become more confident and range anxiety will be less of an issue. In parallel battery technology will improve and make public charging infrastructure less important locally with a residual importance for long distance journeys.

In reply to Bonnie Fenton

Re: Unit 5: Taking into account partners and stakeholders

by Jelena Nikolić -

In order to improve the transportation in the city and facilitate the development of infrastructure, the city authorities shiuld adopt a Strategy for improving traffic. In process of preparation of the Strategy should be involved: PE Directorate for urban planning and construction, all PE ( for all types of infrastructure  water, electrical, heating, gas etc), Department for fire protection, Transportation company, taxi companies, schools.

There is no producers of EV chargers on the territory of Kruševac. New technology will bring new jobs and it should be take into consideration maintaining the infrastructure. 

There are secondary mechanical and electrical engineering school in Kruševac, so it would be good to put in school program a new direction (course) for training for this profession.

Jelena