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Task 3 (Module 3.2)

Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Kristin Tovaas -
Number of replies: 13

Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic? If so:

  • What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?
  • Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?

If not:

  • Is your city considering implementing similar measures? Which ones?
  • Which measures in this category (if any) do you think would be most effective for your city to implement with regard to their impacts on transport network performance?

Please post your response in the forum along with any relevant photos, links, videos, etc.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Jelena Nikolić -

Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic?

In the past few years, City of Kruševac invested mainly in improving pedestrian infrastructure (widening sidewalks, implementing tactile tiles, introducing pedestrian zones, introducing speed limit zones) and much less in cycle infrastructure. In most of the cases, on-street parking was removed to provide widening sidewalks (and in some cases to place benches and trees).

widening sidewalk


  • What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?
City didn't measure the impact of implemented measures, but it was noticed that there were no negative impacts.

  • Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?
For widening sidewalks, there were no debates before implemenatation and in most of the cases there were no complaints after, except in one case. In one street, because of congestion and safety reasons, the street was redesinged. Previously street was for two-way traffic and on-street parking with narrow sidewalks. Part of the street was turned into one-way traffic street with on-street parking and sidewalks were widened. After the implementation of measures, there were many complaints and big pressures from citizens on local authority to abandon this solution, Although the measures had the positive impact on safety in traffic, because of the big pressure from citizens, City had to rethink about new solution. So the street was again turned into two-way traffic street, but the on-street parking was removed. Now the problem is that cars often occupy sidewalks.

  • Is your city considering implementing similar measures? Which ones?
  • City plans to redesign main street in city center because of congestion. It is still on discussion what will be the best solutions and what will be best accepted by citizens. Some  suggested to place traffic light for pedestrians on pedestrian crossing, because they thought that pedestrians were the main cause for congestion. But this idea wasn't accepted.
  • Congestion in main street and pedestrian crossing
  • Still is on discussion what will be better solution: to remove on-street parking and to introduce bike lanes or to close city center for car traffic and to turn into pedestrian zone. During last Summer and European mobility week city centre was closed for traffic every day from 18h-22h. We wanted to see what will hapen. That measure didn't cause congestion, citizens (mostly kids) like it very much, the problem was with parking and we had some complaints from public bus drivers, since they had to change bus route a little bit.

In reply to Jelena Nikolić

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Frederic Rudolph -

This is interesting. You mention: "After the implementation of measures, there were many complaints and big pressures from citizens on local authority to abandon this solution" (one way traffic instead of two-way traffic). I can imagine that citizens complaint about additional travel times. So was travel times part of the discussions and has the city made something like a before-after comparison of travel times and congestion? Many thanks.

In reply to Frederic Rudolph

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Jelena Nikolić -

Actually, the main fact that citizens used to complain about this traffic solution wasn't their travel time with private cars. They didn't want to change their driving habits, but in process of complaining, as a key argument for abandoning traffic solution, they mentioned the travel time of ambulance. The hospital is in the same street (in part of street with two-way traffic), and as I mentioned above only one part of the street was turned in street with one-way direction. Citizens assumed that ambulance will have longer travel time with this traffic solution.

The situation with this project helped to raise awareness about importance of public participation in decision making process. 


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Violeta Mihalache -

I do not think these kind of measures are possible in Timisoara in the near future, both of the lack of political will and of general understanding of the use of such measures.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Timothé Bronkhorst -

Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic?

The "Métropole de Lyon" has invested a lot in reducing car lanes in dense urban areas. Many projects are finished or are in progress, but the most important are on major roads  :

- cours Garibaldi : two tunnels has been shut down, the car lanes has been reduced from 6 to 4, the parkings were reduced too, a two-way bike lane and a bus lane has been added and the sidewalks were widened. https://www.grandlyon.com/projets/lyon-rue-garibaldi.html

- cours Lafayette (ongoing project) : car lanes will be reduced from 2/3 to 1, a two-way bus lane is implemented, bike lanes are implemented too and sidewalks are widened when possible. http://www.sytral.fr/300-c3.htm

- cours Emile Zola : the 2 cars lanes per direction has been reduced to 1 per direction, bike lanes were added and sidewalks widened. http://www.mairie-villeurbanne.fr/projet_cours_emile_zola.html


If so:

  • What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?

Most project didn't have much impact on congestion, because of modal shift or because drivers changed their routes. Some projects had an impact on nearby streets which saw their traffic increase quite a lot. Some areas where no other routes are available are more congested, but they are only a few.

  • Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?
There was debates before the implementations, but not that strong. Most inhabitants see those projects as an improvement for their everyday life. "Hardcore" drivers are angry of course but the mentalities are changing, the traffic reduction is more and more accepted, and the bike counts are increasing a lot each year.

In reply to Timothé Bronkhorst

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Frederic Rudolph -

Dear Timothé,

great to hear the citizens are satisfied with these measures. Has Lyon conducted and published any kind of evaluation? If yes, could you share the link? (I read some French)

In reply to Frederic Rudolph

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Timothé Bronkhorst -

I am not aware of available data or evaluations on those measures, sorry... Perhaps they made some internally and didn't publish the results, but I'm not sure of that.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Cristina Villalón Robles -

Module 3.2: Infrastructure for moving traffic

Task 3

·Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic?

As regards extension of space for cycling, the city of León has implemented throughout last years several measures in order to favour mobility by bike, such as the construction of 28.2 km of segregated bike lanes in the municipality; the installation of bike racks with more than 1,000 parking places; and the creation of bicycle boulevards (speed limit 30 km/h) in major streets to create low-speed streets where cyclists and public transport have priority and private cars share space only when circulating at low speed. This measure also helps to arrange a safe bike network (30 kph speed zones and neighbourhoods, bike lanes and bike boulevards).

Regarding enhancement of space for walking, new pedestrian lanes and bridges have been constructed and the whole Old Town has been pedestrianised by redeveloping streets and improving its infrastructures. The works included pavement signposting of the ancient contour of the medieval wall in 3 streets in which it had disappeared and the restoration of the ancient Roman city wall, creating a pedestrian promenade.

Reallocation of road space away from motorised traffic in the city also included some measures for accessibility: amelioration and widening of sidewalk borders; placement of tactile tiles in pedestrian crossings; embedment of LEDs in pedestrian crossings; rising of pedestrian crossings up to pavement level and lowering of pavements in pedestrian crossings to road level (depending on street conditions); implementation of a 10 kph zone in the Old Town and 30 kph zones in some main streets and most neighbourhoods.

·What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?

Congestion has not increased in the city.

·Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?

No. In fact, new pedestrianisation works are planned for the city center and the extension of traffic calming measures is also expected.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Francisco Faria -

As part of the renewal of Lisbon streets, cycling and pedestrian infrastructures are being created or enhanced.

A example of these projects is the the urban renewal of two main avenues in Lisbon (Avenida Fontes Pereira de Melo, Avenida da República) and the adjacent public space.

Changes to the public space include the removal of barriers to pedestrian circulation and improvement of the pedestrian crossings, the addition of a cycling infrastructure, improved accessibility and overall reduction in traffic speeds. The trade-off was a shrinkage of the space available to private transportation, with the suppression of selected lanes and overall reduction in lane width.

  • What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?
As part of the traffic study developed by us (TIS) it was estimated a reduction in capacity to private transportation of about 15%.

  • Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?
There was a strong debate, with a lot of public discussion. The main arguments made against the project related to the reduction of on street parking places.


In reply to Francisco Faria

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Predrag Živanović -

·Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic?

As already mention in introduction part, the City of Belgrade focused its efforts to infrastructure measures. However, a dis balance in transport supply is present comparing different city parts. In the new part, Novi Beograd, almost all important street have cycle lanes due to its good topography. Also, riversides are covered with good infrastructure both for walking and cycling. Hilly old town is far less attractive for cyclist, combined with transport network of narrow streets, results in almost non existing cycling infrastructure. But, the new plan will turn city centre into pedestrian zone in next couple of years.

·What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?

Congestion even increased because of motorization rate and cycling and walking measures had little or non to do with it.

·Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?

There were some campaigns, but it can not be called strong debates. This is changing slowly and promotional activities on the new pedestrian zone in city centre are more and more intensive.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Amiram Rotem -
  1. Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic? If so:

yes we implement cycle lanes

  • What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?

Very small since only less then 1% use cycling

  • Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?

 Yes there was a debate. The main grummet against was the only few will cycle on a daily base in so hilly city. The answer was people not cycle if the is not safe cycle lanes and that the electric bicycle will overcome the hills.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Simonas Puzonas -

Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic?

no

Is your city considering implementing similar measures? Which ones?

no. politicians inconvenient to take unpopular decisions. People do not understand how you can create unfavorable conditions for use of the private car, minus the land and there making bicycle lanes. Thus, the allocation of funds to build bicycle paths are in last place.
Which measures in this category (if any) do you think would be most effective for your city to implement with regard to their impacts on transport network performance?
I think all the measures are appropriate in different areas.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 3 (Module 3.2)

by Daniel Álvarez Varela -
Has your city implemented comparable infrastructure measures for moving cycle or pedestrian traffic?
In the last year the city council add a bike lane integrated in the right lane inside one of the principal itineraries in the city, from the arena to a new expansion zone called Eras de Renueva. The left lane maintained the 50 km/h speed limit and the right reduced to 30 km/h the speed limit.

What impact have the measure(s) had on congestion?
Only one part of the itinerary have a little problem in some hours with congestion, but it's not a problem generated by the new infraestructure.

Was there a strong debate before and/or after implementation? If so, what were the arguments that were made?
The measure has not a strong debate, only the bumpers to reduce the speed were the problem. But the plan to extend the measure in more itineraries are not implemented by the city council.
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