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Task 7 (Module 4.2)

Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Kristin Tovaas -
Number of replies: 10

Please respond to the following questions in the discussion forum:

  1. What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin? Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? Would this work in your city?
  2. Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?
In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Jelena Nikolić -

  1. What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin? Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? Would this work in your city?

The proposed plan will have positive effects on traffic and environment for sure. It is interesting that proposed solution is similar to square design 100 year ago. New designed square will attract more pedestrians. Maybe to add some green area and trees to provide more pleasant environment for pedestrians in this space and prevent creation of "heat island" during summer time (if Dublin has hot Summer).

This type of solution will work in City of Kruševac.

2. Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?

We didn't have similar public participation process, since we didn't have appropriate tools. As I mention in previous chapters, City wants to redesign traffic in city center. So, we didn't made simulation of different designs, we have closed part of the main street for vehicle traffic every day from 18h-22h during Summer time and we followed the reactions. 


The part of the street marked with orange line was closed to vehicle traffic during certain period.
In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Cristina Villalón Robles -

Module 4.2: Decision making in Dublin: College Green

Task 7

1. What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin?

Definitely, it is an ambitious plan and fully appropriate in my opinion. The fact that the plan has reserved considerable space for pedestrians together with segregated lanes for cyclists not only gives weight to soft mobility modes but can also improve air quality in the area.

Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes?

I know the city as a tourist but not the transport situation in detail. In any case I find the plan suitable to accommodate transport modes, even though some bus routes and taxi/car itineraries are expected to change. Maybe bus reorganisation in the area could solve this constraint at least in the mid-term.

Would this work in your city?

León is quite small in comparison with Dublin and we do not have a similar scenario, but allocating more public space to pedestrian mobility has always worked. As an example the first large pedestrianisation that took place in the late nineties, which really sparked citizen’s interest. From that moment similar projects have been well accepted by the population. As I mentioned before, the city experienced an entire important pedestrianisation in Calle Ancha (Broad Street), the main street of the Old Town. In that time, not much public participation occurred (as a public involvement initiative organised by the City Council). At the beginning, quite an important number of citizens complained about the project due to the potential traffic problems, public safety concerns and the economic impact in the area and surrounding streets. Afterward, road traffic and public transport (bus) were reorganised and nowadays Calle Ancha is a nice bustling safe commercial street. 

2. Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?

We have had such processes when doing the SUMP, some urban projects, and at present since we are developing a ‘Traffic and road safety local regulation (by-law) specific for pedestrians and cyclists’. Our experience is good. Public participation processes are essential in decision making for the successful implementation of projects and plans.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Violeta Mihalache -

Courageous and ambitious approach! It is a big plus the fact that the pedestrians will „gain”so much  more space.

We had in Timisoara a project to pedestrianize the old city center – 3 squares and 10 streets (only the tram and the pedestrians are allowed), but it is not as big as in Dublin. Even if the streets in the neighbourhood are now much more crowded, the project was a success, fully appreciated by the inhabitants.

We had similar participation process but on development strategies, not on specific projects – such as the General Urban Plan – when public meetings were organized on each neighbourhood, on different topics.

In the picture, what is in black became pedestrian-only streets and squares


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Francisco Faria -

  • What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin? Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? Would this work in your city?

Without a deeper knowledge of the traffic in College Green (traffic volumes, public transport lines, pedestrian volumes and cycling volumes) and the historical importance of this "square" I don't have and opinion about the proposed plan.


  • Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?

We have had some similar public participation processes in Lisbon for similar projects were public space allocated to cars was reduced to enhance pedestrian and cycling facilities. Although the outcome was positive many people still have difficulties seeing the bigger picture when taking part in these processes.


In reply to Francisco Faria

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Frederic Rudolph -

As far as I am informed the Dublin City Council, thanks to comprehensive analysis (supported by transport models) manages to keep motorised traffic moving.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Predrag Živanović -

Please respond to the following questions in the discussion forum:

  1. What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin? Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? Would this work in your city?

This is very interesting and bold proposal for redesign public space. It looks like all transport modes are satisfied regarding their needed space. Maybe they could try to fully integrate walking and cycling with public transport as mix lanes. 

  1. Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?
Belgrade has various project planned or ongoing, regarding transport system. I have already referred to turning city centre in pedestrian zone. Different problems have arisen though, on regards public transport. There was an idea to completely remove PT for that area, but accessibility would be highly affected. Also, during several public consultations a big issue were the three new underground parking garages in same area. 

The other example is even bigger project call Belgrade Waterfront, a complete rebuild of old city riverside with new traffic infrastructure.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Timothé Bronkhorst -

  1. What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin? Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? Would this work in your city?

This plan is great for giving more space to walking and cycling, in an area where pedestrians are so numerous. It will be more comfortable and more secure for non-motorized modes, but it's difficult to evaluate the impact on other modes as data are not available. Such changes in the buses routes must be analyzed precisely to evaluate if PT are not penalized by the new layout.

In Lyon such configurations could occur, but are still a bit "timid" in areas where pedestrians are in the majority.

  1. Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?

In Lyon, public participation is quite common but they're a bit confidential and are not done on a large scale. They're interesting but usually end up with the same conclusions : more space for walking and cycling, but also more parking areas, free flow for traffic, more trees... They can be contradictory and authorities are making decisions at the end most of times. It could be interesting to include the public into constructing the scenarios, but this could imply a lot of work for every participant.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Amiram Rotem -

  1. What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin? Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? Would this work in your city?

I like the plan because it puts pedestrians and cyclist first before traffic and as a result there will be a significant improvement in the environmental parameters and in the flow of traffic in the area. As a result of the plan, a new public square will be created probably with more trees -free of transportation with much better air quality that will better represent the name "college green" -  that will attract more pedestrians, especially tourists, thereby contributing to the economic improvement of the area.

In Jerusalem, similar changes were made in the past that made roads in the city center pedestrian only. City council overcame objections to the traders. Due to improvements in trade and environmental quality, the model was extended to other streets in the area. Restrictions on the entry of private cars have also been imposed at the Jaffa Gate in the Old City, and physical improvements have been made in favor of pedestrians.

2. Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?

Yes, we have a similar public participation procedure. Plan are presented to the local public at several meetings. Sometimes a program changes in the light of public comments, sometimes even significantly and sometimes it is not possible to accept public comments. In my opinion this procedure is complex, time-consuming but necessary but necessary. The main problem is to identify the "public". Who is the "public" that participates in the meetings? Whom does he really represent and what interests ? Happens after the end of the process comes another "public" and claims that the program was not presented to him and he wants to change it and so on..




In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Simonas Puzonas -

1. What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin? Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? Would this work in your city?

I think good and right decisions. We have a similar situation with the transit of the Old Town.

2. Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?

We didn't have similar public participation process.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 7 (Module 4.2)

by Daniel Álvarez Varela -
What do you think of the proposed plan for Dublin?
It's a big change for a central city space, it's important for pedestrian and public transport (with a n.
Definitely, it is an ambitious plan new traffic situation for all the citizens.

Do you think it can effectively accommodate all transport modes? I think that a new bus network in the zone may be implemented. But I don't know the bus network and the incidence in it.

Would this work in your city?

It was a similar project in León in the last part of the past decade, the tramway line will generate a new central space, the change proposed is to reform that:


In the new central space for the tramway, losing the actual concept of bus stop for urban and metropolitan bus lines:
The new space will be like that:


The tramway works stopped in 2011, and today only a little part of the project is workig.

Have you had similar public participation processes for major projects in your city? How have they worked out? What do you think of them?

During SUMP development there a little participation process, but indeed is not a common rule in the city.