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Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?

 
Picture of Kristin Tovaas
Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Kristin Tovaas - Monday, 13 November 2017, 10:55 AM
 

Refer back to the table on page 9 from the Victoria Transport Policy Institute and post your answers to the following questions in the discussion forum:

  1. Do you think your city is working mostly within the ‘old paradigm’ or the ‘new paradigm’? In what ways?
  2. If you answered ‘old paradigm’, is your city making any progress shifting towards a ‘new paradigm’ approach?
  3. If you answered ‘new paradigm’, what are some of the best specific examples you can give that demonstrate their approach?

Feel free to post photos to illustrate your points!

Picture of Jelena Nikolić
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Jelena Nikolić - Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 1:30 PM
 

The city (decision makers, urban planners and traffic planners) still has mindset within "old paradigm". This related to local traffic policy, parking policy, urban plans and for reconstruction of streets. And the regulation on national level is the same. We have the regulation that for 1 apartment you must provide 1,5 parking lot, and 1 parking lot for 70m2 of commercial area, no consideration  for sustainable modes in policies (obligation to provide possibility of usage of sustainable modes instead of private cars). Providing parking place in front of shops, apartments, schools and kindergartens is common situation. Cyclist are almost invisible for decision makers, urban planners and traffic planers.

But this started to change a little bit. There are the projects and measures that improves traffic safety in school zones, accesibility to people with disability (tactile pavement on sidewalks, improvement of pedestrian crossings for people in the wheelchair), reconstruction of parks and establishment of openair gym equipment, establishment of speed limit zones, development of SUMP, organizing "play-out" street in the city centre  every evening (7 days during European Mobility Week 2015, 2 months in 2016, from 1st June- 1st October in 2017.). This "play-out" street had a great impact in raising awareness among citizens and decision makers. This measure showed that different possibilities for usage of public space, that is usually occupied with cars. This was the soft mode of showing the different use of space without infrastructure intervetions. This measure was very well accepted by citizens, especially children. The problem was with habit of car parking in this street.

Picture of Cristina Villalón Robles
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Cristina Villalón Robles - Monday, 20 November 2017, 2:03 PM
 

Task 1.2

  • Do you think tour city is working mostly within the old ‘paradigm’ or the ‘new paradigm’?

Actually, with the ‘new’ one.

  • If you answered ‘new paradigm’, what are some of the best specific examples you can give that demonstrate their approach?

The city considers transportation in an inclusive way, managing accessibility in a holistic way. Some examples are as follows:

  • Launch of the app 'Accessibility line’ (to communicate incidents to do with accessibility).

  • Delivery of new ‘accessibility labels’ to shops and business establishments that have improved their accessibility conditions. León has currently 45 accessible establishments, 24 with ‘excellence’ label.

  • Pavement Plan for streets: signposting, renewal and construction of pedestrian pavements.

  • Accessibility and mobility plan: Rising of pedestrian crossings up to pavement level and lowering of pavements to road level to improve accessibility. Installation of tactile pavements.

  • Periodic meetings of the Accessibility Commission, which is one of the work areas of the Municipal Disability Assembly that works to make the municipality accessible to all people.

  • Installation of an acoustic system for traffic lights, with remote control, for blind or visually impaired people. The system is based on small electronic devices situated over the upper part of the traffic light posts. The traffic light remains silent and only produces a sound signal once it has been activated by a user, with a small omni-directional remote control. This avoids the typical noise nuisances of the old systems with continuous noise in every crossing cycle.

There is a multimodal consideration of transportation, favoring public transport and soft modes. Some examples are:

  • CYCLING: Improvement of cycle facilities (more than 5,000 bike racks in the city). Implementation of bicycle boulevards (speed limit 30 km/h) in major streets to create low-speed streets where cyclists and public transport will have priority but motor-vehicle traffic will share the lanes when circulating at low speed. This measure will also help cyclists cross the city and will assemble areas where cyclists ride safe (30 km/h speed zones and bike lanes). Public bike loan system. Drafting of the Ordinance for Pedestrians and Cyclists.

 

  • WALKING (mostly 2017): Arrangement of sidewalks and improvement of pavement in the historical center. Redevelopment of Astorga Street in order to transform it into a pedestrian boulevard. Urbanization works in the surroundings of the Congresses Palace, giving place to bigger pedestrian areas. Building of footpaths in the upper part of the Roman wall. Pedestrianisation of Capilla and Mercado streets, in the Old Town (in previous years almost the whole area of the Old Town has been pedestrianised). Installation of new accessible sidewalks in Plaza del Grano and renovation of part of the original pavement of the square, dated in the Middle Ages. Renovation of parks and gardens: Park of the Kings, Polígono X, San Mamés, Pizarro. Acquisition of new banks to renovate the existing ones in streets, squares and parks. Call for tenders for the renovation of public lighting in the city of León.

  • PUBLIC TRANSPORT: Approval and implementation of a rate free of charge for children less than 14 years in public transport (by bus). Modification of 6 urban bus lines to increase the number of users. Beginning of the works to underground the railroad infrastructure in the city. Continuation of the integration works of FEVE (narrow gauge train). Arrival of high-speed trains to the city.

Objectives also contemplate energy efficiency and saving and a great importance is given to road safety.

  • ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND SAVING: Acquisition of 11 autogas vehicles and 2 electric vehicles for the Local Police. Implementation of charging points for electric vehicles (tourisms, motorbikes) in the city. Metered parking system free of charge for electric vehicles. Exemption (75%-50%) on the municipal vehicle-tax for electric vehicles and those that use autogas and natural gas.

  • ROAD SAFETY: Celebration of the European Day Without A Road Death, EDWARD, on 21. September. Portable traffic radar installed every day in different points of the city to monitor road speed. Photo-red traffic lights; four units in streets with high traffic flow. Development of regular campaigns on road safety: speed control; seat belt use; safety belts and safety seats for children; motorbike driving; intake prevention of alcoholic drinks and drugs; prevention of running-overs; compulsory technical inspections; freight transport; circulation in roundabouts. Provision by the Local Police of a road safety course for Civil Protection agents. Workshops by the Local Police on road safety education in kindergartens.

Economic and social impacts are also considered:

ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL: European funding for the development of the Integrated Sustainable Urban Development Strategy, which covers degraded areas and others where greater social inclusion is necessary.


Picture of Timothé Bronkhorst
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Timothé Bronkhorst - Tuesday, 21 November 2017, 10:51 AM
 

In Lyon, we're still between the old and the new paradigm. We're close to the new one but still not completely there.

We are taking account of every mode of transportation for urban design, but we're still focusing on car traffic and on PT, not that much on walking and cycling. There are more and more cycling infrastructure and accessible sidewalks, but the space dedicated for them is often what's left from car and PT. And we're still talking about mobility and not about accessibility, except for disadvantaged people.

But lots of things are improving : accessible sidewalks and PT stops, bike infrastructure on every new road design, less space for cars and more for PT, cycling and walking in a lot of new projects, etc. The city is going in the right direction but is often a little "modest" on what they could do to truly integrate every mode of transportation and give more space to cycling and walking.

Picture of Jelena Brković
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Jelena Brković - Tuesday, 21 November 2017, 1:34 PM
 
  1. Do you think your city is working mostly within the ‘old paradigm’ or the ‘new paradigm’? In what ways?

        The "old paradigma" is mostly working at  decision makers, urban planners and traffic engener. Especially in urban plans and for reconstruction of streets, where is no place for cycle lanes at all and sidewalk is nаrrow. Cyclist and pedеstrians are invisible for decision makers, urban planners and traffic planers.

    2. If you answered ‘old paradigm’, is your city making any progress shifting towards a ‘new paradigm’ approach?

       Big progress is made with development of SUMP and organized Europеan mobility week (2015, 2016, 2017), so after that some decision makers starts to realize the  importance for sustainable mobility and importance to provide conditions for cyclist to use cycle lanes.


   

Picture of Xiaoyun Zhang
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Xiaoyun Zhang - Sunday, 26 November 2017, 10:36 PM
 
  • Do you think your city is working mostly within the "old paradigm" or the "new paradigm"? In what way?

    The province of Utrecht, especially the city of Utrecht is right in the middle and a pivotal transport hub of the Netherlands. Our city has been suffering long enough for over-saturated traffic flow, especially if there is a roadwork situation, then everything seems to stand still. It is a comfort to see that the city is working mostly within the new paradigm in recent years.

  • If you answered new paradigm, what are some of the best specific examples you can give that demonstrate their approach?

    The main approach of Utrecht is heading towards accessibility. The slogan is: you can reach Utrecht and travel inside Utrecht via vehicle, bicycle and public transport. Due to the heavy density of vehicle, cyclist and pedestrian traffic, the city tries to involve everyone to be prepared themselves before they make their trips, including trips to or from Utrecht, trips passing by Utrecht or trips within Utrecht.

    The public transport network of Utrecht is quite mature and complete. The Utrecht train station is the busiest one in the Netherlands. Route advice for train, bus and tram is given instantly in traditional way-broadcasting inside the train station, and via apps such as NS route planner and 9292.nl. Any road works and train track works have to be planned in advance and to make sure as many as possible travelers are aware of them. All these measures have received some positive effect for encouraging people to use public transport instead of driving.

    Utrecht has introduced and implemented the idea of environmental zones, called Milieuzone in Dutch. In the city center and city center adjacent area, these zones prohibit diesel vehicles that are first registered before 2001 to enter. Cost for violation ranges from 90 to 230 euro.

    Another measure is to introduce paid parking. Traditionally, paid parking is mostly from Monday to Saturday. From this month till the end of 2017, the city hall is organizing is an online polling in my neighborhood and several others around the city center, to ask residents to vote for or against paid parking enforcement on Sunday. These measures all have the purposes of forcing a modal shift from vehicle to public transport or cycling.

    As mentioned in my task 1.1, cycling has a share around 34% in Utrecht, together with cars (39%), they are two of the major transport means in Utrecht. The city has been creating more infrastructure for bicycles. Bicycles being stolen is a serious issue in Utrecht. The government has been providing more and more bicycle racks in the city center around the shopping area and the train station. Most of them are free of charge and protected areas to avoid thieves. But I think they should keep working on it because the thief rate of bicycles is still really high, especially residential areas around the city center where people park their bicycles right outside their houses and still get stolen, on which the police can do nothing about. In my neighborhood, there is at least one bicycle being stolen every two days. My electrical bicycle is also a victim of thievery three weeks ago.

    The city has been trying to modify traffic signal control for the bicycles, aiming for high priority to cyclists without delaying public transport in conflicting directions. So far, I have seen a bicycle traffic signal with time to green count down at the stop line.


Picture of Remus Szigeti
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Remus Szigeti - Monday, 27 November 2017, 10:53 AM
 

Do you think your city is working mostly within the "old paradigm" or the "new paradigm"? In what way?

Our city is working on the new paradigm because the City Hall had approved in the City Council the Developement Mobility Urban Strategy that contains a lot of mobility projects.

If you answered new paradigm, what are some of the best specific examples you can give that demonstrate their approach?

 In the Developement Mobility Urban Strategy there are projects such as:

- buying electrical and hibryd buses

- 22 km of bike tracks

- bike sharing system

- electric cars charing stations in public parking places

-tranformation of car lanes in bike tracks


Picture of Milena Perpelea
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Milena Perpelea - Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 3:08 PM
 

Do you think your city is working mostly within the "old paradigm" or the "new paradigm"? In what way?

Our city is working on the new paradigm because the Ploiesti municipality had approved in the City Council the Developement Mobility Urban Strategy that contains new mobility projects and also  projects designed to continue projects started or completed in the previous programming period of structural funds .

If you answered new paradigm, what are some of the best specific examples you can give that demonstrate their approach?

 In the Developement Mobility Urban Strategy there are projects such as:

- buying new buses

- buying new trams (we have new tram lanes)

- bike tracks

- bike sharing system

- the construction of intermodal terminals

- creating dedicated routes for public transport


Picture of Daniel Pavleski
Re: Task 1.2: Which paradigm is your city working within?
by Daniel Pavleski - Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 11:23 PM
 

Do you think your city is working mostly within the ‘old paradigm’ or the ‘new paradigm’? In what ways?

We are still working mostly with the "old paradigm" but we are slowly shifting towards the "new paradigm" approach.


If you answered ‘old paradigm’, is your city making any progress shifting towards a ‘new paradigm’ approach?

Yes, there is small progress shifting towards a "new paradigm" approach especially with the projects for relocation of road space to cyclists (transforming of traffic lanes into cycle lanes) and pedestrianization of certain streets (transforming into public spaces).