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Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace

 
Picture of Kristin Tovaas
Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Kristin Tovaas - Monday, 20 November 2017, 12:50 PM
 
  1. How is congestion understood in your work context?
  2. What barriers to these ideas would you have to overcome amongst colleagues, supervisors, political officers?
  3. What can you do to bring the FLOW approach to your workplace?

Please post your responses below in the discussion forum.

Picture of Jelena Nikolić
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Jelena Nikolić - Friday, 24 November 2017, 1:07 PM
 

  1. How is congestion understood in your work context?

Usually when congestion is mentioned, first impression is "stuck in traffic", many cars on the street, waiting on junctions or slowly moving, hardly to find available parking and possible delay of public bus. Similar situations that tackle walking, cycling or many passengers in public bus is not mentioned as congestion. So congestion is mentioned only in perspective related to vehicles.

2. What barriers to these ideas would you have to overcome amongst colleagues, supervisors, political officers?

Firstly to start thinking about walking and cycling as a modes of transport. Also, the existing legislation on national level that provides regulations about the size of radius of curvature on the junctions, minimum number of parking lots considering the numer of apartments and bussines area etc.  is also a barrier. Existing legislation still puts the vehicles infront of the humans. For political officers the challenge will be to use some model tool in decision making process, before the implementation of the measure in order to realize full impact of the measure. 

3.What can you do to bring the FLOW approach to your workplace?

The development of SUMP and organization of various events have the positive impact on raising awarenes about sustainable modes of transport and shifting from "old paradigm" to "new paradigm". Giving suggestions and comments with this topic during the development of urban plans can help in changing the attitude about meaning of congestion among traffic planners. Sharing the ideas with collegues during events organized within the network Civinet Slovenia, Croatia, South East Europe can contribute to spreding the FLOW approach in region.
Picture of Bronwen Thornton
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Bronwen Thornton - Friday, 24 November 2017, 4:05 PM
 

Hello Jelena

You outline some very typical barriers to approaching our transport systems from a FLOW perspective!  I really appreciate the challenge of even getting walking and cycling considered as transport!  Its good to see some of the avenues you have for shifting the paradigm and I hope once the FLOW project is complete, some of the stories from our partner cities will be inspirational to both technicians and politicians.

I wonder if the paradigm is different for your political decision makers to your technicians? Does one want to do things different but is deterred by the other?

I think the idea of integrating FLOW approaches into small demonstration projects presents a great opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of the tool and the benefits of the changes in the street.  

We open Unit 4 on Monday which will explore the other FLOW tools and how they can assist.  

thanks Bronwen

Picture of Jelena Nikolić
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Jelena Nikolić - Monday, 27 November 2017, 10:01 AM
 

Hello Bronwen,

thank you for the comments and questions.

Sometimes I think that polical decision makers will accept the new paradigm rather than the technicians. The technicians is get used with doing the work by the "old school" regulations, which they know well, so the shifting to the "new paradigm" can be considered as going out from their work comfort zone.

The small demonstration projects and examples from cities can provide good material to encourage the technicians to consider different posibilities in their work.


thanks, Jelena

Picture of Milena Perpelea
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Milena Perpelea - Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 3:35 PM
 
  1. How is congestion understood in your work context?

Congestion for us means: inadequate design of traffic areas, too many cars in the street, many cars parked along the streets, lack of signs and markings, badly thought-out intersections, lack of roundabouts.

2. What barriers to these ideas would you have to overcome amongst colleagues, supervisors, political officers?

- Promoting walking and cycling as a modes of transport.

- Restoration of traffic lights at junctions with modern equipment (automatic traffic control, LED traffic lights, pedestrian crossovers).

 - Equipment for intersections with presence detectors and cameras.

- Agreements between policy makers regarding the public transport in the areas adjacent to the city. In this way will be less private cars in the city.

3.What can you do to bring the FLOW approach to your workplace?

The understanding of a SUMP and organization of various debates have the positive impact on raising awareness about sustainable modes of transport. Giving suggestions and comments with this topic can help in improving the understanding of policy makers, of the traffic planners. The fact that the decision factors of our city took part at one of the Flow meeting (in Munich) was of real use because they find out that a mobility plan must be understood, thought and applied, that it is not just a piece of paper.

Picture of Jelena Brković
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Jelena Brković - Monday, 4 December 2017, 3:26 PM
 
  1. How is congestion understood in your work context?

Congestion is always mentioned in "car" context, many cars on the street, low speed and no available parking space.

2. What barriers to these ideas would you have to overcome amongst colleagues, supervisors, political officers?

Political officers and colleagues put cars on first pleace. They should realize that walking and cycling is a modes of transport with influence on congestion. So the city have to offer infrastructure for all transport modes. Also it is necessary to develop and conduct campaigns for change of traffic habbit. 

3.What can you do to bring the FLOW approach to your workplace?

Every year in annual plan for the development the city of Krusevac can include measures for promotion infrastructure for walking and cycling, organization a round table and workshops with decision makers nad local urban planners.

Picture of Bronwen Thornton
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Bronwen Thornton - Wednesday, 6 December 2017, 12:59 PM
 

Hello, sorry for a slightly late reply

I am wondering - if you can present walking and cycling projects as not 'competing' with cars but potentially helping car traffic flow...  - would people be more likely to listen?


thanks

Bronwen

Picture of Jelena Brković
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Jelena Brković - Thursday, 7 December 2017, 8:30 AM
 

Among other things, presenting examples of other cities will be very useful for communication about this topic and perhaps it would be easier to understand.

Thanks for your question,

Jelena Brkovic 

Picture of Xiaoyun Zhang
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Xiaoyun Zhang - Friday, 8 December 2017, 10:42 PM
 

  1. How is congestion understood in your work context?

When we talk about congestion. First thing comes to the minds of most people is traffic jams of how many kilometers on the roads during morning and evening peak hours, that prevent us to get on and off the highway or stuck on the highway. We rarely say there is congestion on the bicycle lanes. The reasons could be there is long enough green duration at traffic signal or high rate of red light violation.

  1. What barriers to these ideas would you have to overcome amongst colleagues, supervisors, political officers?

Most barriers are amongst political officers who are stilling trying to solve traffic jam the in the old paradigm. Putting less emphasis of cycling and walking to other transport mode need to be overcome.

  1. What can you do to bring the FLOW approach to your workplace?

Give more research results and solutions to project managers, product managers who are in direct contact with political officials.


Picture of Cristina Villalón Robles
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Cristina Villalón Robles - Monday, 11 December 2017, 10:07 AM
 

Task 3.1. Bringing the FLOW approach to your work place.

1.     How is congestion understood in your work context? As a result of high traffic density (mostly caused by motor vehicles) in a specific time framework.

2.     What barriers to these ideas would you have to overcome amongst colleagues, supervisors, political officers? For some people demand is still the main objective, therefore if car demand grows more place should be given to it. That is why technicians in my city work to support walking and to foster cycling as common transport modes, to change these people behavior and objective.

3.     What can you do to bring the FLOW approach to your workplace? Since congestion under the FLOW approach includes urban transport infrestructure for all transport modes (not just for motor vehicles), refers to both demand and capacity, and accounts for user perceptions, delay and level of service should also be indicators to describe the multimodal performance of the urban road transport network in my city.


Picture of Timothé Bronkhorst
Re: Task 3.1: Bringing the FLOW approach to your workplace
by Timothé Bronkhorst - Wednesday, 20 December 2017, 4:16 PM
 

  1. How is congestion understood in your work context?

Mostly car congestions. Like others, it's linked to high densities of cars and longer travel times, but we only look at the public space taken on street, and rarely the number of people involved. In Lyon we don't have streets were cycle lanes are crowded, so we're not speaking of congestions for bikes. As for pedestrians, crowded areas are around train or metro stations, and commercial areas, but in those areas pedestrian are usually well included in street and intersection design.

  1. What barriers to these ideas would you have to overcome amongst colleagues, supervisors, political officers?

The most difficult idea is to make people understand that improving comfort / security / travel time for cyclists and pedestrian won't necessarily penalize cars, but can have a neutral effect or a positive effect on traffic if we take account on traffic evaporation and modal report. The projects can be short sighted, as changing the design of a street or intersection could have negative effect in the "short term" (a few weeks for simple projects, longer for bigger ones), and it needs a great amount of political courage to see the "long term" .

My colleagues don't really need to be convinced, they already are, but convincing political and technical officers can be more difficult.

  1. What can you do to bring the FLOW approach to your workplace?
I have to immerse a bit more in the Flow approach to understand how I can use it in my everyday projects and simulations. Some clients could be ready to use it, but it needs a bit of work to adjust all parameters and hypothesis.