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Task 5.1: transferability of meaures to your city's context

Task 5.1: transferability of meaures to your city's context

by Kristin Tovaas -
Number of replies: 4

Now it is your turn to think about your own city. Please post your responses to the following questions in the discussion forum below.
Please select one of the measures that cities undertook in module 5.2 and 5.3 that could be relevant for your city (e.g. creating  a new pedestrian zone or widening foot paths).

  1. How could the quantitative “Quick Facts” (i.e. the figures) about the impact of your selected measure be of use to your city?
  2. Can you imagine a similar impact of the measure in your city? Why or why not?
  3. How would you evaluate the impact of the measure in your city once implemented?
In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 5.1: transferability of meaures to your city's context

by Jelena Nikolić -

Please select one of the measures that cities undertook in module 5.2 and 5.3 that could be relevant for your city (e.g. creating  a new pedestrian zone or widening foot paths).

- measure: car- free zone, example from Paris, France

  1. How could the quantitative “Quick Facts” (i.e. the figures) about the impact of your selected measure be of use to your city?

The result "30% less cars in city centre" and the phenomenon of "disappering" traffic are the good arguments that can be used during the process of choosing the best solution for the congestion problem. Mainly decision makers are worried that establishment of car-free zone will cause the more congestion instead of posibility that traffic will "evaporate" and that citizens will chainge their routes or travel habits.

2. Can you imagine a similar impact of the measure in your city? Why or why not?

Probably the impact will be the similar, but I wonder were there any complaints from citizens (or other stakeholders) in Paris on the begining of the implementation of the measure. Was the public involved in proces of mesure development? And is the measure implementet at once or in phases? Were there any negative result?

3. How would you evaluate the impact of the measure in your city once implemented?

We can evaluate the impact of the measure comparing the results before and after the implementation:

 - the number of cars, cyclist and pedestrians in the city centre zone

- noise level and air quality

- new business opening

- travel time

- modal share

- incerased of atractiveness of public space and possibility to organize different events, better urban environment for people to meet and interact 

- number of tourists


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 5.1: transferability of meaures to your city's context

by Jelena Brković -

Please select one of the measures that cities undertook in module 5.2 and 5.3 that could be relevant for your city (e.g. creating  a new pedestrian zone or widening foot paths).

- measure: narrowing roads to reduce crossing distance for pedestrians, example from Lisbon, Portugal1.

1. How could the quantitative “Quick Facts” (i.e. the figures) about the impact of your selected measure be of use to your city?

The results: shorting the distance for pedestrian crossing and lowering the speeds of cars when turning will have positive impact on pedestrian safety feeling.

2. Can you imagine a similar impact of the measure in your city? Why or why not?

Yes, the impact will be probably the similar, because we have the similar traffic situation like in Lisbon.

3. How would you evaluate the impact of the measure in your city once implemented?

We can evaluate the impact of the measure comparing the results before and after the implementation:

 - travel time for cars and pedestrians

-data about traffic accidents with pedestrians

-survey among citizens about traffic safety feeling

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 5.1: transferability of meaures to your city's context

by Cristina Villalón Robles -

Task 5.1: Transferability of measures to your city's context.

Now it is your turn to think about your own city. Please post your responses to the following questions in the discussion forum below.

Please select one of the measures that cities undertook in module 5.2 and 5.3 that could be relevant for your city (e.g. creating a new pedestrian zone or widening foot paths).

1. How could the quantitative “Quick Facts” (i.e. the figures) about the impact of your selected measure be of use to your city?

For sure, the impact would be positive after little time. In fact, when we have accomplished measures to reallocate space for pedestrians in León, at the beginning there was also a fear that these measures could increase congestion, as in Strasbourg, but in the end everything has worked well.

2. Can you imagine a similar impact of the measure in your city? Why or why not?

Yes. When spatial changes occur in cities, it is quite normal that not only politicians or technicians are afraid of them but also population. In any case, when space is given to pedestrians or soft transport modes, eventually, citizens do not want to return to the initial situation.

3. How would you evaluate the impact of the measure in your city once implemented?

We have never measured the impacts of such measures, what is definitely a good reason and strategy to support them.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Task 5.1: transferability of meaures to your city's context

by Timothé Bronkhorst -

  1. How could the quantitative “Quick Facts” (i.e. the figures) about the impact of your selected measure be of use to your city?

Well, reduction of the number of cars or the drop in travel time for PT are interesting, especially to convince quickly many people. But I am a bit wary of those Quick Facts, as opponents can use them too to discredit a project. For the Quais de Seine in Paris, opponents said that pollution went up on certain streets touched by traffic "report", and made that a solid argument to oppose people who said this project was better for the environment.

  1. Can you imagine a similar impact of the measure in your city? Why or why not?

In Lyon, many projects of this type have already been made, a lot more can be made though.

  1. How would you evaluate the impact of the measure in your city once implemented?

In Lyon measures are rarely evaluated, which is a pity. I guess on important projects the city could make those evaluations (pollution before / after, counts of cars / pedestrian / bikes before / after, etc.), but it has a cost and funding are dropping every years...