Discussion forum

Unit 1 Task

Unit 1 Task

by Kristin Tovaas -
Number of replies: 18

Let’s introduce ourselves and set the context for the cities we’ll be working with for the rest of this course. Please answer the following questions:

  1. Where do you work and what do you do there?
  2. What is the population of your city?
  3. What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between neighbourhoods in this regard?
  4. What is the modal split in your city?
  5. What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

Please post your responses in the discussion forum below so your fellow participants know who you are.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Vimal Kr Gahlot -

I work for CMG Center for Research and Sustainable Development,Jaipur,India we are in research and finding solution for sustainable and smart urban development.

Jaipur city populations more than 3.0 million

Mobility is more dependent on motor vehicles and pedestrian facilities are lacking.

CAR 5%  PUBLIC TRANSPORT 28% TW 42% NMT24% OTHERS1%

PLANNING FOR MULTI-MODAL TRANSIT SYSTEM UNDER IMPLEMENTATION


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by SANTO ABATE -

  1. Where do you work and what do you do there?

I'm the Energy Manager of Municipality of Acquappesa, in the South of Italy

      2. What is the population of your city?

1876

      3. What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between   neighbourhoods in this regard?

We project our first SUMP in November 2018

      4. What is the modal split in your city?

Our city is split in 3 part: Marine area, Country Zone and Thermal baths

      5. What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

We have started implementing SUMP


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Saša Džumhur -

1. Senior Researcher in IPSA INSTITUTE LLC SARAJEVO;

2. City of Sarajevo: 275.524; Canton Sarajevo: 413.593;

3. Very bad (poor safety, illegal parking, poor public transport etc.)  tramvaj_automobil_Sarajevo_Citatelj.jpg

4. Official data are not available. My estimation: 90% cars, 8% public transport, 2% other (walking, cycling etc.)

5. None, but SUMP and Public transport study are on agenda of the Canton Sarajevo Government.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Judith Castellanos -


1. I am working in my office of architecture and urban resilience with new city initiatives in the north of Mexico.

2. 4,689,601. millions of people

3. Most part of the population uses private car because we have a bad quality on public transport. The social difference is reflected in the mobility, for a high economic status the use of car is a social obligation. The vulnerable parts of the city don’t have a proper system to mobilize all the people, the government invest on streets but no in a better mobility system.

4. 72% use private car and 27% public transport, 1% walking o bicycle.

5. We have a plan for 2030 but we don’t have specific policies to increase the use of public transport or to implement new alternatives as walking o bicycle.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Jelena Nikolić -

Hello everyone,

I'm an architect and I work for the City of Kruševac on development and implementation of the projects related to sustainable urban mobility, as advisor for sustainable urban mobility and energy efficiency . I worked on development of the SUMP of the City of Kruševac (first SUMP in Serbia) and I'm also supporting cities in region to develop SUMP and organize EuropeanMobilityWeek.

Current situation is that number of inhabitants is decreasing and number of vehicles is increasing. City of Kruševac covers the 101 settlement with around 125.000 inhabitants (63% urban and 37% rural).

Modal split 2016Modal split for the city of Kruševac (2016): walking (44%), cycling (3%), public transport (19%), car (32%), taxi (2%)

Modal split (2019) for the neighbourhood United Nations

Modal split for the selected neighbourhood "United nations"; walking (32%), cycling (14%), public transport (9%), taxi (3%), car 42% (as driver (31%), as passenger (11%)).

Comparing this 2 modal splits, we can say that the residents of neighbourhood use car and bicycle more than avarage in the city, but less walk and use public transport. 

City has developed and addopted the SUMP in 2017. It's in the implementation phase now.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Angelos Smaragdakis -

1.       Where do you work and what do you do there?

I study for my MSc in the Technical University of Crete and I work there as a researcher, too.

2.       What is the population of your city?

My city, Heraklion Crete has 305.490 residents.

3.       What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between neighborhoods in this regard?

Mobility situation in my city is bad. A combination of narrow streets and everyday traffic jam in downtown. Of course, as you go away from downtown the situation is getting better. The fact is, that the situation of the streets and tarmac is bad and the public perception of mobility laws poor.

4.       What is the modal split in your city?

Official data are not available. My estimation: 80% of cars, 10% public transport, 10% other (walking, cycling etc.)

5.       What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

Probably none, but SUMP and a new, safer high way for Crete are on the agenda of Greek Government.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Gulcan Orak Oruc -

  1. Where do you work and what do you do there?

I am an independent researcher in London with sustainable transportation and city life expertise.

  1. What is the population of your city?

      The census in the United Kingdom takes place every ten years by the Office for National Statistics. The most recent one completed in 2011. According to this census, the population of London was 8,173,941. According to ONS estimation for 2018 total population is 8,908,081. 

  1. What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between neighbourhoods in this regard?

There are great implications which are the best cases for many other cities in the world to promote sustainable mobility alternatives. The public transportation network is very well designed. Yet, car dependency is still observed. In the neighbourhood level, it depends on the location. In the east of London, there are dedicated infrastructure investments which are a bit ahead of using sustainable alternatives comparing with central neighbourhoods.

  1. What is the modal split in your city?

According to Transport for London, the journey stage-based mode share in 2017 : 45% public transportation, 32% private transport, 2% cycle, 21% walk.

  1. What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

Mayor’s Transport strategy uses the Healthy streets Approach. The aim is to make %80 of all trips on foot, cycle or public transport by 2041. In this direction, boroughs can get money to improve its infrastructure. Cycle lanes are going to be extended and connect each other. In April this year, ULEZ policies are introduced. Many participatory activities occur related to car-free days.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Jelena Brković -

Hello everyone,

1. I'm traffic engineer and I work in the City of Kruševac, Serbia as advisor for traffic regulation, also since 2015, I have been actively working on the promotion of sustainable modes of transport. I worked on development of the SUMP of the City of Kruševac (first SUMP in Serbia) on development and implementation of the projects related to sustainable urban mobility and organize EuropeanMobilityWeek.

2. City of Krusevac -around 125.000 inhabitants.

3. Mobility situation: everything is adapted to the car, plans, projects, which affects people's awareness and high frequency of everyday traffic, noise and air pollution. There are no associated bike racks in the city, no bike rental system, public transport does not follow european trends. Using a bicycle in a modal split of 3% is not so bad, since there is a lack of infrastructure. The situation is similar in all settlements in the city.

4. Modal split for the city of Kruševac (2016): walking (44%), cycling (3%), public transport (19%), car (32%), taxi (2%)

5. City has developed and addopted the SUMP in 2017. It's in the implementation phase now.


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Sini Lamoureux -

Hello everyone,

My name is Sini Lamoureux and I work for the Union of the Baltic Cites (UBC) Sustainable Cities Commission which is hosted by the city of Turku in southwest Finland. I currently work as a project officer mainly doing communication and dissemination for the Interreg funded project cities.multimodal which focuses on sustainable urban mobility in the Baltic Sea area.

The population of the city of Turku is about 190 000. I would describe Turku's mobility situation as adequate. The market square in the city center has been under construction for the past year, the construction project has put a strain on the overall accessibility in the city center regarding all mobility modes. There are big differences between neighborhoods within the city. A good example is the e-scooters that you can e.g. only use in the central parts of the city. 

The modal split in Turku:  Cycling (13%)  Public transport (9%) Walking (30%) Cars (48%)

The city of Turku aims at becoming carbon neutral by 2029 that which means that there are several policies and plans developed to promote enivronmentally firendly mobility modes.

In reply to Sini Lamoureux

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Miri Reiss -

Hello Sini and everyone,
I'm Miri from Jerusalem, Turko is known as part of the Baltic healthy cities network leadership.
It may be enlightening to learn if and how SUMP meets health promotion considerations in Turko. 

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Giannakos Lazaros -

I work as a site civil engineer for FRIGO STAHL SA, a construction company based in Thessaloniki, Greece, and specialized in industrial buildings and refrigeration. The project I am occupied is the building expansion of the industry "HELLENIC DAIRIES S.A. - TYRAS", located in the 5th km Trikalon-Pilis.

I am from Trikala, Greece and I currently live here. The city population is about 61.000 while the population of the municipality of Trikala is about 81.000.

Mobility is mainly motorized and traffic happens to be heavy in peak hours. Public transport, constituted of six public bus lines, is poor mainly serving the suburban regions. There is also a bicycle path covering 1,6% of the city’s road network, which is considered to be a big portion when it comes to cities in Greece. The flatness of the city makes cycling easy and there is the possibility to rent a public bike. There is also the possibility to rent electrified vehicles demonstrated by the ELVITEN project. The project SMART Trikala is also being implemented since 2017 demonstrating smart parking system, data collection and analysis and traffic light monitoring system among others.

There is no official data. It is expected to be available soon as part of the SUMP that is currently being implempented. Car has certainly the biggest portion, while motorcycle and cycling are also used especially in the city center. I believe public transport has small portion.

SUMP is being implemented. There are also several EU funded projects taking place. Electrified vehicles (ELVITEN), co-creation of the city (Cities-4-People) and automated road transport (AVINT) are some of the concepts under consideration. Automated buses were previously demonstrated in Trikala within the CITYMOBIL2 project in 2016. There is also a project concerning drones delivering small packages on the way.
In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Giannakos Lazaros -

I work as a site civil engineer for FRIGO STAHL SA, a construction company based in Thessaloniki, Greece, and specialized in industrial buildings and refrigeration. The project I am occupied is the building expansion of the industry "HELLENIC DAIRIES S.A. - TYRAS", located in the 5th km Trikalon-Pilis.

I am from Trikala, Greece and I currently live here. The city population is about 61.000 while the population of the municipality of Trikala is about 81.000.

Mobility is mainly motorized and traffic happens to be heavy in peak hours. Public transport, constituted of six public bus lines, is poor mainly serving the suburban regions. There is also a bicycle path covering 1,6% of the city’s road network, which is considered to be a big portion when it comes to cities in Greece. The flatness of the city makes cycling easy and there is the possibility to rent a public bike. There is also the possibility to rent electrified vehicles demonstrated by the ELVITEN project. The project SMART Trikala is also being implemented since 2017 demonstrating smart parking system, data collection and analysis and traffic light monitoring system among others.

There is no official data. It is expected to be available soon as part of the SUMP that is currently being implempented. Car has certainly the biggest portion, while motorcycle and cycling are also used especially in the city center. I believe public transport has small portion.

SUMP is being implemented. There are also several EU funded projects taking place. Electrified vehicles (ELVITEN), co-creation of the city (Cities-4-People) and automated road transport (AVINT) are some of the concepts under consideration. Automated buses were previously demonstrated in Trikala within the CITYMOBIL2 project in 2016. There is also a project concerning drones delivering small packages on the way.
In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Ruxandra Aelenei -

Hi everybody, so nice to be in such an international and multidisciplinary environment! 

My name is Ruxandra Aelenei. I am originally from Romania, but I have been living now from some time in The Netherlands and yes...I bike every day! :D

1. Where do you work and what do you do there?

       I am an urban planner specialised in Sustainable Urban Mobility and I work for a small Dutch company called MOVE Mobility. We develop and work on sustainable mobility plans, strategies and analysis for cities all over the world (Georgia, Armenia, Romania, Palestine, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Uganda, South Africa, etc.). I hope to use the knowledge I get from this course to improve the planning process in the cities where we work. 

2. What is the population of your city?

       I live in Utrecht, population 350,000 (and growing). 

3. What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between neighbourhoods in this regard?

For sure there are differences, depending on the neighbourhood. These have to do with various socio-economic factors (age, origin, income).  

4. What is the modal split in your city?

36% cars; 30% bike; 16% walking; 16% public transport; 2% others (data from 2017-2018)

5. What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

More or less all documents possible. Since Utrecht is already performing so well in terms of mobility (of course improvements are always needed) I would be happy to work on a case study you would recommend me - your city, your favourite vacation destination, you name it. Otherwise I will stick to my city. smile

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Violeta Mihalache -

1. Where do you work and what do you do there?

I work at Urban Survey Timisoara, a NGO that is active in the fields of urban mobility and urban regeneration, with a cross-cutting approach on civic involvement and participation.

2. What is the population of your city?

Timisoara is the third largest city of Romania, with a population of roughly 350,000 people.

3. What is the mobility situation like in your city?

A city in love with car, with massive investments in car infrastructure. Still, the city has a long tradition in public transport and huge yet unexploited potential.  The tram network is the backbone of the Timisoara public transport system and is the third most extensive tram network in Romania. (the first horse-drawn tram line was opened in Timisoara on July 8, 1869, electric tram was introduced in 1899 and the trolleybus in 1942). Unfortunately, an old and insufficient fleet of trams (and buses and trolley-buses) makes the public transport unattractive – for example, the waiting time for tram, during rush hours is over 20 minutes. Within the historical city there is a good network of side-walks, that are in a bad condition and unattractive for pedestrians. The side-walks/pavements network was designed a century ago in such a way that the city can be crossed from one South to North through parks. Regarding cycling, the lanes are unsafe and not connected, but there is a growing cycling community that put pressure on the public administration.

Are there any differences between neighbourhoods in this regard?

No, there are no differences.

4. What is the modal split in your city?

According to the SUMP (approved in 2016), the modal split for Timisoara is 41 – car, 25 – public transport, 34 – walking. Cycling could not be calculated, but I estimate is at 3, maybe 4.

5. What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

The main planning documents related to urban mobility: SUSTAINABLE URBAN MOBILITY PLAN (2016),  MASTERPLAN OF DEVELOPMENT part of GENERAL URBAN PLAN (2010) and SUSTAINABLE ENERGY AND CLIMATE ACTION PLAN (2014)


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Pauline Munoz Olsö -

·Where do you work and what do you do there?

I work at Koucky & Partners as a mobility and traffic consultant. At the moment Im involved with different projects for companies as well as the municipalities regarding both strategy and implementation. The biggest project related to neighbourhood that Im involved with is a project where im creating a mobility strategy for a large property owner in Gothenburg with 392 properties and with a total of 19 410 apartments. They also have 7200 parking spaces.

 ·What is the population of your city?

Gothenburg has 1 miljon inhabitants 

·What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between neighbourhoods in this regard?

Gothenburg is the founder of Volvo and is a very car friendly city especially regarding attitudes in the society.  We have trams and buses and also a big barrier with a big river in the middle of Gothenburg where we hae 2 bridges when 4 is needed. To solve it we have ferries going over the river.  There are differences between neighbourhoods. We have a few satellite areas where it takes quite long time to go by public transport in comparision to the car. The closer to the inner city

 

·What is the modal split in your city?

(2017)

45% car

28% public transport

6% bicycle

20% walking

 

·What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

The City of Gothenburg has a traffic strategy that includes mobility and a climate strategical program that says that we need to increase the amount of cars and Prioritize and invest in walking, bicycle and public transport.

 


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Zahrah Ali -

Hi all,

Apologies for the delay in introducing myself!

My name is Zahrah Ali and I am the Electric Vehicle Officer at the London Borough of Haringey. My purpose is to stipulate our electric vehicle policy, and deliver projects to increase electric vehicle demand in the borough. On a broader note - I also work on the Council's Climate Action Plan, with aim for the borough to decarbonise by 2041.

The population of Haringey is approximately 271,000.

The mobility situation in Haringey is assessed by Transport for London's 'Public Transport Access Level' (PTAL) index. Some areas are ranked with the highest score of 6b, and some areas are rated 0. There are good radial transport links connecting the borough with central London. It has three London Underground lines, as well as being served by the London Overground and National Rail services. Haringey has a network of 46 bus routes which are predominantly radial. There is a network of cycle routes across the borough, including cycle lanes on main roads and separated cycle lanes. The west of the borough lacks rail infrastructure and relies on bus service, but predominantly car use. The west has the highest levels of car ownership and use (and is also the wealthier side of the borough). We also have a number of car clubs operating in the borough, and electric vehicle demand is growing significantly.

The modal split of transport modes is approximately: 40% car use; public transport 37%; walking 22%; cycling 1%.

Haringey has a Transport Strategy (2018) that contains mobility related policies:

- Healthy Streets; safe and secure streets; reduce congestion; clean and green streets; improving public transport networks; ensuring public transport is safe, affordable and accessible, amongst others.
- There are three action plans to support these outcomes: Electric Vehicle Action Plan, Cycling and Walking Action Plan and Parking Action Plan.

Links to various transport related documents can be found below, if they are of interest to anyone!

- Haringey Transport Strategy: https://www.haringey.gov.uk/sites/haringeygovuk/files/haringey_transport_strategy_2018.pdf
- Local Implementation Plan: https://www.haringey.gov.uk/sites/haringeygovuk/files/2018_consultation_draft_of_the_haringey_lip3.pdf
- Draft Electric Vehicle Action Plan: https://www.haringey.gov.uk/sites/haringeygovuk/files/draft_ultra-low_emission_vehicle_action_plan_consultation.pdf


In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Franca Carassai -

Where do you work and what do you do there?

I am an Architect and Urban designer, working as a consultant in Villa Constitucion, Argentina.

  1. What is the population of your city?

47903 (2010 census)

  1. What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between neighborhoods in this regard?

Most part of the population uses private cars, if not all of them. As regards public transport, we have a very poor service practically inexistent.  

  1. What is the modal split in your city?

Official data are not available. Although I could estimate: 80% of cars, 5% public transport, 15% other (walking, cycling, etc.)

  1. What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

Take the public transport out what means a city without any type of mobility apart from cars or bicycles.



In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1 Task

by Loredana Modugno -

  1. Where do you work and what do you do there?

Hi, everybody!

My name is Loredana Modugno, I’m architect and urban planner and I work for Ginosa Municipality,  actually I’m directly involved in the implementation of Ginosa first SUMP. I’m also Mobility Manager and I collaborate different municipalities and associations in Apulia Region.

  1. What is the population of your city?

Ginosa is a small town in the province of Taranto (Apulia, southern Italy) very closer to Matera (24,8 km from Ginosa) European Capital of Culture 2019. Ginosa, which also includes the shoreline of Marina di Ginosa, is the last municipality of the Ionian province on the border with Basilicata.

The municipality of Ginosa, has a territorial area of about 187,06 sq. Km, and a population of about 22.547 (M 11.224, F 11.323) inhabitants, with a settlement density of about 120 ab / sq. Km.  

During the summer the resident population of Ginosa Marina rises from 5,000 inhabitants to 40-50,000 presences, reaching peak daily rates of over 70,000 tourists on Sundays in August.

The relatively flat landscape is cut through with a number of deep canyons (gravine) created by rivers flowing into the Gulf of Taranto. Ginosa is also part of  the Regional natural park of “Terra delle Gravine”the third largest park in Puglia after the Gargano and the Alta Murgia parks. Ginosa has a very fragile territory and has recently suffer a nefarious flood event, for this it needs to start over.

  1. What is the mobility situation like in your city? Are there any differences between neighbourhoods in this regard?

The city of Ginosa has a railway station located at Ginosa Marina (20,7 km from Ginosa) a part of Ginosa Municipality. Ginosa Marina is a seaside resort in the Gulf of Taranto.The railway line is very important because it guarantees the right to mobility for students, workers, tourists and other citizens  of Puglia and Basilicata.

Private Car is predominantly used (about 65%). Public Transport (extra-urban) is generally used only for systematic trips and connect Ginosa with other cities.

Both Ginosa and Ginosa Marina have many pedestrian little squares and parks but not sufficiently interconnected. 

  1. What is the modal split in your city?

Car 65% Public Transport 16% Walking 15% Cycling 4%

  1. What mobility-related policies and plans does your city have in place?

The municipality of Ginosa, in line with European, national and regional targets, has started a structural reorganization of urban mobility by adapting the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP) in order to reduce the negative impacts of transport, improve accessibility, encouraging more sustainable means of transport, improve the quality of life for citizens, visitors and other stakeholders.

Ginosa’s overall goal is to become a sociable, environmental, economic and sustainable city to visit, live and work in.

               In the last few months Ginosa was working on the implementation of several measures focused on: accessibility security and public space requalification (restricted zone, traffic calming measures, accessibility for all, etc.); cycling infrastructure (new cycle networks, new cycle parking and storage); parking management (parking regulations); public transport (new interchange nodes; reorganization of bus routes, new bus fleet - small & Low-Carb e-bus) accompanying and awareness-raising measures (mobility management, integrate SLP3 in the city’s long-term strategies).

The municipality has already approved some strategic actions and initiatives to improve its SUMP:

  •  Apply to Civitas SUMPS-up Learning Programme - SLP3. SUMP Learning Programme 3 (SLP3) was a chance to take best practice used elsewhere and create our own local adaptations. The most useful aspect was to learn the different methodologies adopted to elaborate SUMP process. The workshop held in the host cities has been an opportunity to share reflections, proposals and useful tools, stimulating a dialectical interaction between the actors involved. The meeting has been also a challenge to learn from the most diverse participant backgrounds, promote city cooperation, develop a common vision of mobility, set goals and strategic objectives. Thanks to SLP3  Program Ginosa is working on a radical transformation not only of urban, infrastructural and transport solutions, but also the mentality and habits of the citizens through a wide-ranging and strategic programming that includes an incisive plan of communication and sharing.
  • Approve the BICIPLAN. In June 2019 the Cycle Mobility Plan, with 65.121 Km new cycle network, has been also approved. (23.321km in urban area – Ginosa and Marina di Ginosa - 41.8 km in extra-urban areas, for tourism) The Plan includes cycle parking and storage, bike sharing and traffic calming measures.
  • Apply to Regional Funding in order to regenerate urban and public space for a better environment. The Municipality of Ginosa has recently won a regional financing for the waterfront renewal (attractive streetscapes and urban environment are important aspect of urban life and quality life in a city).
  • Apply to URBACT III with "The Last Safe Kilometre", promoted by the city of Skawina (Poland)

 Next step should be to promote and share the experience of SUMP Learning Programme (SLP3). The municipality aims to create a specific inter-departmental working group responsible for SUMP development. Through the creation specific mobility offices, the SLP3 activities and knowledge will be embedded within city’s long-term strategies.  This group will need to have sufficient understanding and Knowledge of mobility measures and city administration to be able to perform a good measure selection and to work on a new vision and target of sustainable, efficient and attractive Ginosa.


Attachment 01_Ginosa.jpg