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Unit 1: Introduction

Unit 1: Introduction

by Kristin Tovaas -
Number of replies: 9

There are currently 43 people registered for this course from 17 countries. This is your opportunity to learn about how to perform an impact assessment for urban mobility projects while gaining further insights from each other. We hope you'll share your own knowledge, experience and observations and take advantage of the opportunity for exchange.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Deleted user -

My name is María de Santiago. I work at the Environmental Studies Centre (CEA) of the Vitoria-Gasteiz City Council (Spain).

I’ve been working at CEA for two years and a half in the field of sustainable mobility, especially electric mobility. I am involved in three European projects related to mobility. The objective of two of them is to promote e-mobility in our city (ICT4EVEU and MOVESMART).

In Vitoria-Gasteiz, we have been developing a Sustainable Mobility and Public Space Plan (SM&PSP) since 2006. Through those years, we implemented several measures to improve mobility in our city, most of them with the support of the CIVITAS Initiative. We do a mobility survey on a regular basis to know more the mobility trends but it is not possible to do it every year. More than this, it is difficult to develop an impact assessment after the implementation of each measure (economic costs, time, and personnel resources).

Thanks to the SM&PSP, we have succeeded in reducing private car use, raising the pedestrian share and increasing the use of bicycles, without decreasing public transport share. This great increase in the number of cyclist is the reason of one of our current challenges: the coexistence between pedestrians, drivers and cyclists. We are working to change the behaviour of bike users, because the usually go by the pedestrian areas and sidewalks, and the aim is that they drive along the roads as other vehicles.

The second challenge we want to start to work on is the mobility to work/studies, because the most common mode to do this kind of journeys in our city is by private car.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Deleted user -

My name is Alan Vera, currently residing in Rotterdam for studying purposes. I work at the  Local Government of La Paz, Bolivia, where I am the Director of the Municipal Transport Service. I have managed, planned, and implemented, the first public transport system in the country: La Paz-Bus- PumaKatari. I am really interested in this course since I believe in life-long learning and capacity building. The following is a summary of my education and work experience and some details about the city I am from.

Academic Background and Work: Architect (UCB, Bolivia, graduated with distinction); Master in Architecture and Urban Culture (UPC, Spain, graduated with excellence), Master in Urban Management and Development (IHS-EUR, The Netherlands). Specialisation courses in Transport at world-class institutes such as the LTA Academy Singapore, World Bank Institute, AECID, UITP, GIZ-SUTP, LH Korea, and U.S. Speaker at world conferences in America and Europe: the Latin American Congress of Public Transport and Urban (Ecuador, 2013), the 5th World Urban Forum (Brazil, 2010), and teaching experience as well as author of scientific publications.

Professional Experience: Over 9 years of experience in the transport sector. Having been Director of the National Railway Company (ENFE) and worked for the Vice Ministry of Transportation (VMT) in the largest and most important projects in Bolivia, such as the Bi-Oceanic Central Rail Corridor; Port Projects, airports, and have been part of the development of the National General Law on Transport. Supervisor of feasibility studies for Urban Trains in Bolivian cities, and drafting the urban cableway system between La Paz and El Alto (called Teleferico which is the world´s largest cable-urban system) as Supervision Chief. Transportation Specialist (Local Government of El Alto) designing the BRT system and roads infrastructures.

La Paz is currently a place were different projects are recently implemented, highlighting a new bus service (La Paz-Bus) and the new cableway system (Teleferico, that inaugurated its first line less than 2 weeks ago). Both are part of the Integrated Urban Transport System that has being implemented. Even though these efforts are benefitting greatly the current urban mobility situation in the city, the main problem that La Paz is suffering is the inequal accessibility of vulnerable groups of society, thus; children, elderly and people with disability are still not treated as they deserve. Then, the streets configuration, transit systems and road safety are crucial current focus points that we as local government are going to address. 

Regarding the published impact assessment that the city has undertaken, it is relevant to say that this information is private and has not been socialized.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Deleted user -

Hello I am Adela Garrido. I am working to Gijón City Council (Asturias, Spain). I am a technician involved in CASCADE project where we analysed different areas of efficiency energy including mobility measures.One of the measures adopted with success was "car sharing at City Council". Our Moblity Plan link: http://seguridad.gijon.es/page/11746-plan-de-movilidad

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Deleted user -

Hello everyone,

My name is Bert Wolters and I run my own business as a consultant/project support in sustainability, with a special interest in sustainable transport and mobility.

I live in the Netherlands, in a village called Elst (21.230 inhabitants january 1st 2014), which is part of the rural municipality Overbetuwe (13 villages, 46,653 inhabitants (same date)). It is located between the rivers Nederrijn and Waal, so it is as flat as can be. Overbetuwe is situated in the province of Gelderland (the Netherlands counts 12 provinces) and is one of 20 municipalities participating in the Arnhem-Nijmegen city region, which realises infrastructural and mobility solutions that cover more than one of these 20 municipalities (e.g a fast cycling lane between the cities of Arnhem and Nijmegen).

I have worked on several projects on air quality, where mobility was one of the subjects, although it is merely seen as a problem in the bigger cities Arnhem (around 150,000 inhabitants) and Nijmegen (around 168,000 inhabitants).  I have been witness of the initiation of a new plan for clean public transport, where our regional buses use green gas, regionally produced out of regional green waste. Now our region has the cleanest public transport system of the Netherlands (Arnhem uses electric trolley buses in the city). Initially I am more interested in sustainable logistics, but mobile individuals use the same roads, so if mobility is reduced, it is also good for logistic service suppliers.

Our village does not really have a mobility problem, but has a mobilityplan that has to be renewed. I could not get hold of that plan unfortunately. As our village lies between Arnhem and Nijmegen it looks to be a good place for regional consolidation centres, but untill now no such centre has been realised.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Deleted user -

Thank you Maía, Adela, Alan and Bert for introducing yourself. It is great to see that we have people from different contexts here - representing small cities as well as a city with nearly one million inhabitant. 

I think the different tasks within the e-learnign a a great opportunity to exchange experience and ideas among the participants. So, I would like to encourage the other participants to add as well a few short lines or bullet points your background. 

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Jelena Nikolić -

Hello everyone,

my name is Jelena Nikolić and I am from Kruševac, Serbia. I’m M.Eng in Architecture and I’m working  in a Department for Investments, economy and environment  in City Administration of the City of Krusevac as a Senior Associate. I worked in a Department for Urban Planning and Construction on monitoring procedures for the development and adoption of the Plans, giving opinions and suggestions before adopting the Plan and issuing of the necessary documents for the construction: information about location, location permit, building and use permits. I also was  in a Department for Inspection Activities where I worked as a Building inspector. Before the City Administration, I worked in the project bureau as an architect on designing project for various types of buildings.

 

Kruševac, the city rich in tradition and with centuries-old history, is located in the central part of Serbia. One of the main traffic corridors E-75, which leads from South-East Europe to Western Europe, intersects the sub-region on the Northeastern side of Krusevac. The construction of the E-761 is planned in the vicinity of the industrial zone of the City.

Kruševac is a city and municipality, and the administrative center of the Rasina District, in central Serbia. It covers an area of ​​853.97 km2 and has 101 settlements, of which only the municipality center Krusevac is urban. Its total population is 131.368 inhabitants (by 2002 census).

 

  • Population (total):         131.368 inhabitants (by 2002 census)
  • City Area: 57.347 inhabitants (43.7 %)
  • City Area & Suburban: 78.599 inhabitants (59.8 %)
  • Rural:   52.769 inhabitants (40.2 %)

 

Today, Kruševac is facing the problem of insufficient number of parking spaces in the urban part of the city, poorly developed system of public transportation, lack of bike paths, a small landscaped area, and as a consequence, there is increased air pollution and noise, which is especially noticeable in the city center.

Public transportation has been organized through the system of bus and taxi stations. Great traffic density, low service level and reduced traffic safety in urban area are the consequence of improperly organized public urban and suburban traffic. There is no sufficient parking place downtown. Bicycle traffic is not developed.

There is no bike paths. Bicycle traffic is in parallel with the car traffic (on a same road), which is not very safe. Older people generally use a bicycle when they go to grocery shopping (or green market) and younger ride a bike to the lake or to the mountain Jastrebac (near the city). In several places in the city there is a simple urban movables for parking bicycles. It is absurd that bicycle traffic is not developed, given that in the city is a factory for the production of bicycles.

City of Krusevac has no adopted strategy dealing with traffic issues. The Krusevac City Assembly has adopted in 2011 Sustainable development Strategy 2011-2012 as well as Spatial Plan of City of Krusevac (Official Gazette of City of Krusevac No. 4/2011).

In reply to Jelena Nikolić

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Deleted user -

Dear Jelena,

Thank you for introducing yourself and your city. Kruševac seem to face severe problems related to urban transport. There seems to be a great need for a comprehensive transport plan. 

I assume that the capacities and the monetary resources that the city can invest in urban transport are very limited. Therefore, it is very important to spend the available resources wisely. So a proper ex-ante impact assessment might be valuable tool for your city to select very effective measures and to ensure that high effects are achieved with limited investments. 

You mentioned that your city is facing a lack of car parking space in the urban centre. Maybe this is not a lack of car parking space, but more a consequence of limited or unattractive alternatives to travel by public transport or bicycle. As experience has shown: When you install more car parking, you will get more cars. In a situation where you are already facing congestion , noise and local air pollution, this is probably the last think the city wants to achieve. Impact assessment can reveal such intended effects. 

I hope you enjoy the e-learning course!

In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Jelena Nikolić -

Dear Hanna,

You are absolutely right. We have that problems, that I mentioned, because our politicians and planners still have the old way of thinking. We have to much cars on a streets, because the public transportation is poorly developed and we don't have infrastructure for bicycle. Nobody thought how to improve the mobility in city, mainly because everybody get used to this situation in traffic. So at first place, it is necessary to point out the problem to the local authorities, and than to look out for solutions.

City budget is limited for investment in urban transport, but if local authority is not aware of the problem, the money will be spent in wrong way.

I don't have experience with impact assessment, so this course is very useful for me.

 

Jelena

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 1: Introduction

by Deleted user -

Hi everyone,

I am joining late, but I will try to catch up.

My name is Jesús Martínez and I live in Lugo, a small city in the northwest of Spain, with around 90.000 people.

I am a civil engineer with experience in several fields (maritime works, urban projects, etc) and lately I am involved in some mobility projects, but I have no experience in impact assessment.

The city council of Lugo is now changing the public transport contract and trying to develop the bike infrastructure drafted in the SUMP, but there is no impact assessment as far as I know.