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Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Kristin Tovaas -
Number of replies: 8

Please share your responses to the unit 4 questions here.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Deleted user -

The objective of the draft project is to implement a network of storehouses throughout the city to keep the bicycles in a safe place for those people who don’t have an appropriate space in their own flats. This way, cyclist mobility is expected to increase. The service will be developed by people in risk of social exclusion. 

  • Economic effects:
    • Investment costs
      • Training for bike-watchers
      • Purchasing of tools for maintenance of the bikes
      • Bicycles to go from one store to another
    • Operation costs
      • Storehouses renting
      • Facilities (water, electricity)
      • Personnel costs
      • Maintenance costs
      • Advertising
    • Revenues and penalty payments
  • Environmental effects:
    • Modal split: cyclists rate
    • Noise
    • GHGs
    • Energy
    • City space free
  • Social effects
    • Quality of life
      • Liveability
      • Comfort
    • City image
    • Safety
    • Citizen health
    • Social integration
    • Employment
    • Costs for the users
    • Price of the storehouses

All the economic effects should have quantified indicators but these figures have to be estimated as we don’t have real numbers.

The environmental effects can be measured before and after the implementation of the measure.

Some of the social effects would need to be assessed qualitatively (quality of life, city image) and others can be quantified:

  • Safety: number of car accidents
  • Citizen health: number of respiratory diseases
  • Social integration: number of people in risk of social exclusion working in the project
  • Employment: number of jobs
  • Costs for the users
  • Prices of the storehouses: increasing of the prices
In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Deleted user -

Dear Maria, 

Thanks for this interesting case. I know similar projects that have been implemented in German cities (e.g. Münster, Cologne). 

You identified many important indicators. You mentioned that the majority of your indicators can be quantified. I think in theory this is true. But in practice the situation might be  different. Often local data on specific indicators is not available. Do you think that the city will collect a lot of data for such a measure (e.g. environmental indicators)? Do you apply transport models to generate such data? 

Especially when it comes to linking general data to the specific measure (e.g. in case of the reduction in respiratory diseases) assumptions are necessary.

 Hanna
In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Deleted user -

Dear Hanna:

You are right, the city will not collect all these data to assess a specific measure. My idea of quantifying the indicators is more a wish than a fact.

But I think that it is possible to do some assumptions. For example, if the city achieves a reduction in pollutants emissions, we should estimate the percentage of this reduction that is due to the implementation of a specific measure. The risk is to overestimate the results.

María

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Deleted user -

We are working on a plan of car sharing in a rural environment. The idea is that many people own two cars (or more) and that the second car can be replaced by a car that can be shared with other people. We think of an electric vehicle.

Economic effects: less cars will be sold, and the costs of a car will be lower as they are shared by more people. The money saved can be spent on other issues. As we think of already existing cars to be shared no extra costs are foreseen. Maybe we should invest in an ICT-system where people can make deals, but there are already existing systems for this purpose that can be used. If we want to share en electric vehicle we have to invest in electric cars and in charging infrastructure.

The environmental effects will be that people drive less kilometers, as they cannot automatically take their own car; They have to reflecdt before they travel, so they will look for alternatives. We think that second cars are in general not very well mantained and are not clean types. Shared cars will be more modern and cleaner. So the environmental effects are less pollution and higher safety.

As social effects we expect that there will be more interaction within the community which can be positive. Less car use also means less noise. At the start we have to grow awareness on the subject, which can be a topic to talk about, so also here we can see more interaction in the community.

We should have quantitative data on the number of people who own two cars or more. To measure the effects we need to know how many people have chosen for a shared car in stead of buying another car, and especially we want to know how many kilometers they drive less. To stimulate more people to take part in the project we also want to know how much money people have saved by this project.

In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Deleted user -

Thank you Bert for sharing your case. 

Other important effect you might want to consider:

Street space that becomes available as less on-street parking is needed. (I think in Germany many households with two cars have only one private garage, whereas the second car is parked on the drive way or on the street). 

Accessibility aspects (Some households (e.g. lower income ones), which do not own a first / or second car might participate in the car sharing. This might reduce the net effect of vehicle kilometers reduced, but in light of very limited public transport in rural are it could considerable improve accessibility for certain groups. 

In reply to Deleted user

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Deleted user -

Hi Hanna,

Thank you for your reply. The aspects you indicate are very true, and we haven't thought of them so they are very welcome.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Deleted user -

Hello,

The aim of this project is to create a more bike friendly city but with soft measures (i.e., cheap). It will include not only bike infrastructure but promotion as well. I think that almost every economic and environmental effects should be quantified. Social effects are complex ones, even subjective.

In reply to Kristin Tovaas

Re: Unit 4: The TIDE method - Preparation

by Jelena Nikolić -

Today, Kruševac is facing the problem of insufficient number of parking spaces in the urban part of the city, poorly developed system of public transportation, lack of bike paths, a small landscaped area, and as a consequence, there is increased air pollution and noise, which is especially noticeable in the city center.Public transportation has been organized through the system of bus and taxi stations.

The aim of the draft project is to encourage people to use public bus transportation. The idea is to design maps with bus lines and schedule. Many citizens don’t use buses because they don’t know schedule and which line to use. The maps will be put on bus stops, city website and website of public transportation company.

Economic effects:

-          Investment cost: designing and printing maps,

-          operational cost: maintenance of website, advertisement of public transportation

Environmental effects:

-          less CO2 emission

-          Modal split: more use of public transportation

-          less noise

-          less use of fosil fuels

-          less car on a street and more space for pedestrians and cyclists

Social effects:

-          impoved quality of life

-          citizens health

-          city image

-          costs for the users

-          social integration

All economic and environmental effects can be measured easily. Social effects need to be assessed qualitatively.

 

Regards,

Jelena